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[ {"id":"a18a0dcb-8f60-59cd-bd9a-671c0ce72992","type":"article","starttime":"1440976740","starttime_iso8601":"2015-08-30T18:19:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1440985263","sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Class of 1951 meets Thursday","url":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/article_a18a0dcb-8f60-59cd-bd9a-671c0ce72992.html","permalink":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/class-of-meets-thursday/article_a18a0dcb-8f60-59cd-bd9a-671c0ce72992.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"MUSCATINE, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 The next Muscatine High School class of 1951 luncheon will be at Pizza Ranch, 106 Ford Ave., at 11:15 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 3. All class members, spouses, and friends are welcome.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#off"],"customProperties":{},"revision":2,"commentID":"a18a0dcb-8f60-59cd-bd9a-671c0ce72992","body":"

MUSCATINE, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 The next Muscatine High School class of 1951 luncheon will be at Pizza Ranch, 106 Ford Ave., at 11:15 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 3.

All class members, spouses, and friends are welcome.

"}, {"id":"c5b70ee1-192a-5a4f-9c76-de5a86914bb9","type":"article","starttime":"1440976560","starttime_iso8601":"2015-08-30T18:16:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1440985262","sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Class of 1959 meets Tuesday","url":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/article_c5b70ee1-192a-5a4f-9c76-de5a86914bb9.html","permalink":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/class-of-meets-tuesday/article_c5b70ee1-192a-5a4f-9c76-de5a86914bb9.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":0,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"MUSCATINE, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 The Muscatine High School class of 1959 will meet for breakfast at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1, at The Farmer's Diner, 2300 Park Ave.\u00a0","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#off"],"customProperties":{},"revision":2,"commentID":"c5b70ee1-192a-5a4f-9c76-de5a86914bb9","body":"

MUSCATINE, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 The Muscatine High School class of 1959 will meet for breakfast at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1, at The Farmer's Diner, 2300 Park Ave.\u00a0

"}, {"id":"f798b10d-f3c7-5352-bb49-278025beeb23","type":"article","starttime":"1440975120","starttime_iso8601":"2015-08-30T17:52:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1440986945","sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Celebrating culture","url":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/article_f798b10d-f3c7-5352-bb49-278025beeb23.html","permalink":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/celebrating-culture/article_f798b10d-f3c7-5352-bb49-278025beeb23.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#topstory","#muscatine"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"2c0c21ba-e453-52f5-ae1f-83547d448368","description":"Leonarda Alvarado, left, and Luz Ruiz, both members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in West Liberty, make \"pupusas\" during Sunday's annual Fall Latino Festival held in downtown West Liberty. Pupusas are a traditional dish from El Salvador. Pupusas are corn tortillas with a filling \u2014\u00a0usually cheese, beans, and/or Salvadoran-style finely ground pork.","byline":"BETH VAN ZANDT/MUSCATINE JOURNAL","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"389","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c0/2c0c21ba-e453-52f5-ae1f-83547d448368/55e38a41a3024.image.jpg?resize=620%2C389"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"62","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c0/2c0c21ba-e453-52f5-ae1f-83547d448368/55e38a41f2017.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"188","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c0/2c0c21ba-e453-52f5-ae1f-83547d448368/55e38a41a3024.image.jpg?resize=300%2C188"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"642","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c0/2c0c21ba-e453-52f5-ae1f-83547d448368/55e38a41a3024.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C642"}}},{"id":"9e54b6ab-5c13-546b-ba21-319861e440d8","description":"Bryan Martinez, 12, of West Liberty, tries out his might at the West Liberty Rotary Club's ring the bell game during Sunday's St. Joseph\u2019s Catholic Church annual Fall Latino Festival held in downtown West Liberty.","byline":"BETH VAN ZANDT/MUSCATINE JOURNAL","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"536","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e5/9e54b6ab-5c13-546b-ba21-319861e440d8/55e38a4211757.image.jpg?resize=536%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"115","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e5/9e54b6ab-5c13-546b-ba21-319861e440d8/55e38a4258af2.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"348","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e5/9e54b6ab-5c13-546b-ba21-319861e440d8/55e38a4211757.image.jpg?resize=300%2C348"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1185","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/e5/9e54b6ab-5c13-546b-ba21-319861e440d8/55e38a4211757.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1185"}}},{"id":"e39895c9-26f8-5230-88b8-d34a0d2f3e94","description":"Angela Torres was crowned princess of Sunday's annual Fall Latino Festival in West Liberty. The event was put on by St. Joseph\u2019s Catholic Church of West Liberty.","byline":"BETH VAN ZANDT/MUSCATINE JOURNAL","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"396","height":"620","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/39/e39895c9-26f8-5230-88b8-d34a0d2f3e94/55e38a426c704.image.jpg?resize=396%2C620"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"156","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/39/e39895c9-26f8-5230-88b8-d34a0d2f3e94/55e38a42bc110.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"471","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/39/e39895c9-26f8-5230-88b8-d34a0d2f3e94/55e38a426c704.image.jpg?resize=300%2C471"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1607","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/39/e39895c9-26f8-5230-88b8-d34a0d2f3e94/55e38a426c704.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"f798b10d-f3c7-5352-bb49-278025beeb23","body":""} ]
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[ {"id":"ce911830-8b12-5537-9bc6-a771ba3788e3","type":"article","starttime":"1440939600","starttime_iso8601":"2015-08-30T08:00:00-05:00","sections":[{"local":"news/local"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Eulenspiegel announces season","url":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/article_ce911830-8b12-5537-9bc6-a771ba3788e3.html","permalink":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/local/eulenspiegel-announces-season/article_ce911830-8b12-5537-9bc6-a771ba3788e3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"WEST LIBERTY, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 Eulenspiegel Puppet Theatre has announced its 2015/2016 season. As the year progresses, there are plans to add more weekday performances available to area schools and home-schooled children. Requests and suggestions are taken into consideration. Shows will take place either at the historic New Strand Theatre in downtown West Liberty or at Owl Glass Puppetry Center. The following are the first few events of the season.","supportsComments":false,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#muscatine","#topstory"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"cf21ac30-e896-5e55-85e3-b551b4e0e21d","description":"The Eulenspiegel Puppet Theatre has announced its 2015/2016 season.","byline":"CONTRIBUTED","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"436","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/f2/cf21ac30-e896-5e55-85e3-b551b4e0e21d/55e0bd4cf1a93.image.jpg?resize=620%2C436"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/f2/cf21ac30-e896-5e55-85e3-b551b4e0e21d/55e0bd4d5a835.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"211","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/f2/cf21ac30-e896-5e55-85e3-b551b4e0e21d/55e0bd4cf1a93.image.jpg?resize=300%2C211"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"720","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/f2/cf21ac30-e896-5e55-85e3-b551b4e0e21d/55e0bd4cf1a93.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C720"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"ce911830-8b12-5537-9bc6-a771ba3788e3","body":"

WEST LIBERTY, Iowa\u00a0\u2014 Eulenspiegel Puppet Theatre has announced its 2015/2016 season. As the year progresses, there are plans to add more weekday performances available to area schools and home-schooled children. Requests and suggestions are taken into consideration.

Shows will take place either at the historic New Strand Theatre in downtown West Liberty or at Owl Glass Puppetry Center. The following are the first few events of the season.

Puppet Slam

The Puppet Slam will be 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18, at a location still to be determined.\u00a0

A Puppet Slam is an opportunity to perform and watch short experimental and sometimes outrageous puppet vignettes that are geared towards teenagers and adults. To present a piece, call 319-627-2487. This event is for teens and adults only.

Children\u2019s Festival and Puppet Mini Fest

The 19th annual West Liberty Children's Festival is 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, and will feature five puppet performances by Eulenspiegel and guests from Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri and Nebraska. Shows include King of the Golden River, Native American Tales, George and the Dragon, Of Mice and Mayors, and Little Red Riding Hood. In addition, the festival offers food, beverages, a strolling ventriloquist, juggling, music, and a host of children's games and activities.

King Lear

The Independent Eye theatre ensemble\u2019s inspired two-person vision of William Shakespeare\u2019s King Lear is played out within the confines of an aluminum cage. King Lear and The Fool are accompanied by nearly 30 life-sized, hand, and finger puppets operated by actors and master puppeteers Conrad Bishop and Elizabeth Fuller from California. The performance will be at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 30 at Owl Glass Puppetry Center.

Other performances this season include \"Three Billy Goats Gruff\" on Nov. 6-7, \"She-Roes\" on Nov. 22, \"Sal Fink, Catfish Wrangler\" on Dec. 28, \"Fairy Tales\" in January, dessert theater in February and \"Peter and the Wolf\" in March in addition to other shows and events.

Tickets to family shows are $5 with group prices are available. King Lear, Puppets and Pastries, and Canterbury Tales are $15 in advance or $20 at the door. For more information, call 319-627-2487 or email monica@puppetspuppets.com or visit www.puppetspuppets.com.

"} ]
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[ {"id":"19671430-4822-552b-a873-0c466476eee7","type":"article","starttime":"1440984344","starttime_iso8601":"2015-08-30T20:25:44-05:00","lastupdated":"1440986605","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"Gov. Marvin Mandel, who fell from political grace, has died","url":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/national/article_19671430-4822-552b-a873-0c466476eee7.html","permalink":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/national/gov-marvin-mandel-who-fell-from-political-grace-has-died/article_19671430-4822-552b-a873-0c466476eee7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By BRIAN WITTE","prologue":"ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) \u2014 Marvin Mandel, a former Maryland governor whose 26-year career in state government ended with his 1977 conviction on political corruption charges, has died. He was 95. According to a statement from his family, Mandel passed away Sunday afternoon after spending two days with family in St. Mary's County celebrating the 50th birthday of his stepson Paul Dorsey.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#ap"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"5a73e1fe-5384-5e42-9350-9bd60d74e739","description":"File-This Oct. 6, 2001, file photo shows Gov. Marvin Mandel, accompanied by his wife, Jeanne, walking to the federal courthouse in Baltimore. Mandel, whose 26-year career in state government ended with his 1977 conviction on political corruption charges, has died. He was 95. According to a statement from his family, Mandel passed away Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, after spending two days with family while celebrating his son's 50th birthday. Once considered one of Maryland's most powerful and effective governors, Mandel presided over a major reorganization of state government, built a subway in Baltimore and spent $1 billion on school construction. But his accomplishments were overshadowed by his personal tribulations, which included his trial and a messy divorce when he moved out of the governor's mansion, leaving his first wife behind so he could marry another woman. (AP Photo/Bill Smith)","byline":"BILL SMITH","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"371","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a7/5a73e1fe-5384-5e42-9350-9bd60d74e739/55e3b5ed45004.image.jpg"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a7/5a73e1fe-5384-5e42-9350-9bd60d74e739/55e3b5ed45004.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"218","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a7/5a73e1fe-5384-5e42-9350-9bd60d74e739/55e3b5ed45004.image.jpg?resize=300%2C218"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"742","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/a7/5a73e1fe-5384-5e42-9350-9bd60d74e739/55e3b5ed45004.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"95488730-8bd0-5188-a54b-bb5a41faeaea","description":"File-This Jan. 29, 2009, file photo shows former Maryland Gov. Marvin Mandel posing in front of a photo that dates back to the end of his administration in the late 1970's in Annapolis, Md. Mandel, whose 26-year career in state government ended with his 1977 conviction on political corruption charges, has died. He was 95. According to a statement from his family, Mandel passed away Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015, after spending two days with family while celebrating his son's 50th birthday. Once considered one of Maryland's most powerful and effective governors, Mandel presided over a major reorganization of state government, built a subway in Baltimore and spent $1 billion on school construction. But his accomplishments were overshadowed by his personal tribulations, which included his trial and a messy divorce when he moved out of the governor's mansion, leaving his first wife behind so he could marry another woman. (AP Photo/Brian Witte)","byline":"Brian Witte","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"384","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/95488730-8bd0-5188-a54b-bb5a41faeaea/55e3b5ed4efcf.image.jpg"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"134","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/95488730-8bd0-5188-a54b-bb5a41faeaea/55e3b5ed4efcf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C134"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"400","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/95488730-8bd0-5188-a54b-bb5a41faeaea/55e3b5ed4efcf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C400"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1366","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/95488730-8bd0-5188-a54b-bb5a41faeaea/55e3b5ed4efcf.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":2,"commentID":"19671430-4822-552b-a873-0c466476eee7","body":"

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) \u2014 Marvin Mandel, a former Maryland governor whose 26-year career in state government ended with his 1977 conviction on political corruption charges, has died. He was 95.

According to a statement from his family, Mandel passed away Sunday afternoon after spending two days with family in St. Mary's County celebrating the 50th birthday of his stepson Paul Dorsey.

The cause of death is not yet known.

\"The First Lady and I send our deepest sympathies and condolences to the Mandel family and all those who loved and cared for him. The state of Maryland lost not only a former governor but also a truly great leader and someone countless people thought of as a friend, including myself,\" Gov. Larry Hogan said in a statement Sunday night.

Once considered one of Maryland's most powerful and effective governors, Mandel presided over a major reorganization of state government, built a subway in Baltimore and spent $1 billion on school construction.

But his accomplishments were overshadowed by his personal tribulations, which included his trial and a messy divorce when he moved out of the governor's mansion, leaving his first wife behind so he could marry another woman.

He was convicted in 1977 along with five co-defendants of mail fraud and racketeering. The charges stemmed from what prosecutors said was a complex scheme in which Mandel was given money and favors for vetoing one bill and signing another to help his friends make money on a horse racing track deal.

The conviction remained the dominant event of his career even after it was overturned on a technicality in 1987 because of a Supreme Court ruling in another case.

Mandel, a Democrat, spent 19 months in federal prison until President Ronald Reagan commuted the sentence to time served in 1981. He steadfastly denied any wrongdoing and said he was vindicated when his conviction was overturned.

\"I said then, and I say now, that I never did anything illegal as governor of Maryland,\" Mandel wrote in his 2010 book, \"I'll Never Forget It: Memoirs of a Political Accident from East Baltimore.\"

Attorneys have continued to argue about the case, decades after it faded from national headlines.

At a 2007 forum revisiting the case, Arnold Weiner, who was Mandel's lead attorney, said prosecutors were \"thirsting for more blood\" after prosecuting former Vice President Spiro Agnew, who resigned as vice president in October 1973 and pleaded no contest to one count of income tax evasion relating to his time as Maryland governor.

\"The federal government made a number of efforts to try to criminalize what they couldn't prove as bribery ... but they couldn't prove bribery, so they brought this silly mail fraud case,\" Weiner said in 2007.

But prosecutors said the federal mail fraud charge was applicable to Mandel, because at the time it allowed prosecutions for people who defrauded someone out of property. They said property could include the honest and faithful services of a public official.

Barnet Skolnik, the lead prosecutor in Mandel's two trials, said Mandel was given more than $300,000 in value in the form of business interests, real estate deals and clothing in return for his influence to benefit secret owners of a Maryland racetrack with additional racing days.

\"This was bribery,\" Skolnik said at the 2007 forum. \"This was a huge, very complicated, very sophisticated and very, very well-hidden bribery.\"

Before the charges were filed, Mandel was the undisputed top man in Maryland politics. He became governor on Jan. 7, 1969, when Agnew left to become vice president under President Richard M. Nixon.

Maryland had no lieutenant governor, and the constitution specified that the legislature would elect a new governor. As the powerful speaker of the House of Delegates, Mandel easily rounded up a majority of votes in the General Assembly. The experience made him decide that a lieutenant governor post was needed. He proposed a constitutional amendment creating the office and it passed.

In one of the biggest changes to state government under his tenure, Mandel created a cabinet system in the executive branch that streamlined 240 state agencies that reported to the governor.

Mandel, a popular governor, was elected in 1970 and again in 1974 with about two-thirds of the vote each time. His popularity was undimmed by his divorce from his first wife, Barbara. Mandel announced through his press office on July 3, 1973, that he was leaving his wife of 32 years to marry the woman he loved, Jeanne Blackstone Dorsey.

\"As (press secretary) Frank DeFilippo said when I gave him the statement and told him to take it down to the press, 'This is going to be the biggest explosion on July 4th they've ever had,'\" Mandel recalled in his memoirs.

The first Mrs. Mandel refused to leave the governor's mansion, telling reporters she thought her husband had lost his mind. Mandel moved into a hotel room and then to an apartment while a settlement was negotiated.

Mandel married Dorsey 13 months later, just hours after his divorce became final. Dorsey died in 2001, after 27 years of marriage to Mandel.

He had two children, a son Gary and a daughter Ellen, from his first marriage.

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(Johnathon Henninger/Connecticut Post via AP, File) MANDATORY CREDIT","byline":"Johnathon Henninger","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"351","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/73/c73ebbd0-d4f3-503a-aa3c-a627fbbcd086/55e329563a94c.image.jpg"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/73/c73ebbd0-d4f3-503a-aa3c-a627fbbcd086/55e329563a94c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"206","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/73/c73ebbd0-d4f3-503a-aa3c-a627fbbcd086/55e329563a94c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C206"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"702","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/73/c73ebbd0-d4f3-503a-aa3c-a627fbbcd086/55e329563a94c.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"418803e1-85f9-5388-a0b6-17a1e38390ac","description":"Japan celebrates after winning the Little League World Series Championship baseball game against Lewisberry, Pa. in South Williamsport, Pa., Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015. Japan won 18-11. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)","byline":"Gene J. 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Migrants fearful of death at sea in overcrowded and flimsy boats have increasingly turned to using a land route to Europe through the Western Balkans. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)","byline":"Darko Bandic","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"315","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/3b/d3b1a3ec-322a-52dc-bd6b-9671fd437821/55e3b5ee86ece.image.jpg"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"62","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/3b/d3b1a3ec-322a-52dc-bd6b-9671fd437821/55e3b5ee86ece.image.jpg?resize=100%2C62"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"185","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/3b/d3b1a3ec-322a-52dc-bd6b-9671fd437821/55e3b5ee86ece.image.jpg?resize=300%2C185"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"630","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/3b/d3b1a3ec-322a-52dc-bd6b-9671fd437821/55e3b5ee86ece.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"commentID":"9e63b194-f93a-5d05-9ffb-fd654b25a78d","body":"

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Monday:

1. RAZOR-LINED BORDER CAN'T STOP MIGRANTS FROM EU'S FIELD OF DREAMS

Over the past year Hungary has become the most popular back door for Arabs, Asians and Africans to reach the heart of the European Union without facing further passport or visa checks.

2. 'OLIVER SACKS HUMANIZES ILLNESS'

That's how a Nobel-winning chemist described Dr. Sacks, whose books like \"The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat\" compassionately portrayed people with severe and sometimes bizarre neurological conditions. Sacks died Sunday at 82.

3. WHERE POPE FRANCIS HAS NEVER SET FOOT

When the pontiff arrives at Andrews Air Force Base near Washington in a few weeks, it will mark the first time in his life that he's visited the U.S.

4. WHAT TRUMP'S MASS DEPORTATION PLAN CALLS TO MIND

During the Great Depression, counties and cities in the American Southwest and Midwest forced Mexican immigrants and their families to leave the U.S. over concerns they were taking jobs away from whites despite their legal right to stay.

5. ISLAMIC STATE MILITANTS IN SYRIA SEVERELY DAMAGE THE BEL TEMPLE

The 2,000-year-old temple was part of the remains of the ancient caravan city of Palmyra, seized by IS fighters in May.

6. MOUNT MCKINLEY GETS A NEW NAME

By renaming the peak Denali, an Athabascan word meaning \"the high one,\" President Barak Obama is making a major symbolic gesture to Alaska Natives on the eve of his historic visit to Alaska.

7. WHO HAS A LENGTHY CRIMINAL RECORD

The man charged with capital murder in the fatal shooting of a suburban Houston sheriff's deputy has a record that includes resisting arrest and disorderly conduct with a firearm.

8. COMMUNITY REMEMBERS SLAIN TELEVISION REPORTER AND CAMERAMAN

About 500 people attended a ceremony for Alison Parker and Adam Ward, who were shot and killed while working last week.

9. MILEY CYRUS PROMISES MANY COSTUME CHANGES AS HOST OF MTV'S VIDEO MUSIC AWARDS

In her first incarnation, she strutted on the arrivals carpet in barely there silver straps, shaking a long, rock goddess ponytail.

10. TOKYO WINS LITTLE LEAGUE TITLE

The players from Japan were down eight runs in the first inning, but the Kitasua Little League pounded out 22 hits in an 18-11 comeback victory.

"}, {"id":"4f5c23fb-d8aa-50e5-b94f-52a0d47077d0","type":"article","starttime":"1440982817","starttime_iso8601":"2015-08-30T20:00:17-05:00","lastupdated":"1440986619","priority":0,"sections":[{"national":"news/national"}],"flags":{"ap":"true"},"application":"editorial","title":"White House renames Mount McKinley as Denali on eve of trip","url":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/national/article_4f5c23fb-d8aa-50e5-b94f-52a0d47077d0.html","permalink":"http://muscatinejournal.com/news/national/white-house-renames-mount-mckinley-as-denali-on-eve-of/article_4f5c23fb-d8aa-50e5-b94f-52a0d47077d0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By JOSH LEDERMAN and MARK THIESSEN","prologue":"WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Obama administration will change the name of North America's tallest mountain peak from Mount McKinley to Denali, the White House said Sunday, a major symbolic gesture to Alaska Natives on the eve of President Barack Obama's historic visit to Alaska. By renaming the peak Denali, an Athabascan word meaning \"the high one,\" Obama waded into a sensitive and decades-old conflict between residents of Alaska and Ohio. Alaskans have informally called the mountain Denali for years, but the federal government recognizes its name invoking the 25th president, William McKinley, who was born in Ohio and assassinated early in his second term.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":["#ap"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"b865b906-8773-583d-bebc-49f0dfee9bb8","description":"FILE - This Aug. 19, 2011 file photo shows Mount McKinley in Denali National Park, Alaska. President Barack Obama on Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015 said he's changing the name of the tallest mountain in North America from Mount McKinley to Denali. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer, File)","byline":"Becky Bohrer","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"512","height":"335","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/86/b865b906-8773-583d-bebc-49f0dfee9bb8/55e38afdc4d47.image.jpg"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/86/b865b906-8773-583d-bebc-49f0dfee9bb8/55e38afdc4d47.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"197","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/86/b865b906-8773-583d-bebc-49f0dfee9bb8/55e38afdc4d47.image.jpg?resize=300%2C197"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"670","url":"http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/muscatinejournal.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/86/b865b906-8773-583d-bebc-49f0dfee9bb8/55e38afdc4d47.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"4f5c23fb-d8aa-50e5-b94f-52a0d47077d0","body":"

WASHINGTON (AP) \u2014 The Obama administration will change the name of North America's tallest mountain peak from Mount McKinley to Denali, the White House said Sunday, a major symbolic gesture to Alaska Natives on the eve of President Barack Obama's historic visit to Alaska.

By renaming the peak Denali, an Athabascan word meaning \"the high one,\" Obama waded into a sensitive and decades-old conflict between residents of Alaska and Ohio. Alaskans have informally called the mountain Denali for years, but the federal government recognizes its name invoking the 25th president, William McKinley, who was born in Ohio and assassinated early in his second term.

\"With our own sense of reverence for this place, we are officially renaming the mountain Denali in recognition of the traditions of Alaska Natives and the strong support of the people of Alaska,\" said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell.

The announcement came as Obama prepared to open a three-day visit to Alaska aimed at infusing fresh urgency into his call to action on climate change. To the dismay of some Alaska Republicans, the White House has choreographed the trip to showcase melting glaciers and other cherished natural wonders in Alaska that Obama says are threatened by warmer temperatures.

But Obama's visit is also geared toward displaying solidarity with Alaska Natives, who face immense economic challenges and have warned of insufficient help from the federal government. As his first stop after arriving in Anchorage on Monday, Obama planned to hold a listening session with Alaska Natives. The president was also expected to announce new steps to help Alaska Native communities on Wednesday when he becomes the first sitting president to visit the Alaska Arctic.

It was unclear whether Ohio would mount an effort to block the name change. There was no immediate response to inquiries seeking comment from Republican Rep. Bob Gibbs, House Speaker John Boehner and other Ohio lawmakers.

At 20,320 feet, the mountain stands as the continent's tallest, and is still growing at a rate of about one millimeter per year, according to the National Park Service. Known for its majestic views, the mountain is dotted with glaciers and covered at the top with snow year-round, with powerful winds that make it difficult for the adventurous few who seek to climb it.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, who had pushed legislation for years to change the name, said Alaskans were \"honored\" to recognize the mountain as Denali \u2014 a change in tone for the Alaska Republican, who had spoken out against Obama's energy policies in anticipation of his visit to her state.

\"I'd like to thank the president for working with us to achieve this significant change to show honor, respect, and gratitude to the Athabascan people of Alaska,\" Murkowski said in a video message recorded atop the mountain's Ruth Glacier, with cloudy snow-capped peaks behind her.

Gov. Bill Walker joined Murkowski and other Alaskans in praising Obama for the change. The state of Alaska has had a standing request to change the name dating back to 1975, when the legislature passed a resolution and then-Gov. Jay Hammond appealed to the federal government.

But those efforts and legislation in Congress have been stymied by members of Ohio's congressional delegation eager to protect the namesake of the state's native son. Even when Mount McKinley National Park was renamed Denali National Park in 1980, the federal government retained the use of Mount McKinley to refer to the actual peak.

The White House cited Jewell's authority to change the name, and Jewell issued a secretarial order officially changing it to Denali. The Interior Department said the U.S. Board on Geographic Names had been deferring to Congress since 1977, and cited a 1947 law that allows the Interior Department to change names unilaterally when the board fails to act \"within a reasonable time.\" The board shares responsibility with the Interior Department for naming such landmarks.

The peak got its officially recognized name in 1898, when a prospector was exploring mountains in central Alaska, the White House said. Upon hearing the news that McKinley, a Republican, had received his party's nomination to be president, the prospector named it after him and the name was formally recognized.

Obama won't personally visit the mountain during his tour of Alaska. He'll spend much of the trip in Anchorage, south of the peak, where Obama will speak at a climate change summit on Monday. While in Alaska, Obama also planned to meet with fishermen in Dillingham, hike a glacier in Seward and cross the Arctic Circle to visit the rural town of Kotzebue.

In an attempt to show Obama wasn't coming to Alaska empty-handed, the White House on Sunday also announced plans to create a \"young engagement program\" to help rural and Alaska Native youth in the Arctic. The administration said it would also provide nearly $400,000 for a pair of commissions that govern local fishing, along with more than $1 million in funding from the federal government and Alaska groups to fund U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service advisers.

___

Thiessen reported from Anchorage, Alaska.

___

Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP and Mark Thiessen at https://twitter.com/mthiessen

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