You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
What makes food 'super'? A closer look at the health claims behind the buzzword
spotlight AP

What makes food 'super'? A closer look at the health claims behind the buzzword

  • Updated
  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}
Superfoods

Is there a hotter nutrition term than “superfood”? The word typically refers to foods with particular health benefits, but is this merely a marketing term, or is there actually science behind these superfoods?

“There is no legal definition of ‘superfood,’ but the broadest definition is it’s a food that has extraordinary nutritional benefits,” said Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D.N., C.S.S.D., author of “The Superfood Swap.”

She defines superfoods as foods that deliver phytochemicals— compounds in plants that benefit the plant while it’s growing, but have benefits for us when we eat them — vitamins, minerals, healthy fats and other components that help our bodies thrive.

“I love the term ‘superfood’ because it implies some foods are better for you than others, which is true. I say, all foods fit, but some fit better than others,” she said.

0
0
0
0
0

Satisfy your cravings

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

There’s no gloppy canned soup in this healthy green bean casserole recipe. Simply give cilantro, parsley or chives a whirl in the food processor to make the pesto-like sauce that ties the casserole together.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News